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Organ Marches

March on. Do not tarry. To go forward is to move toward perfection. March on, and fear not the thorns, or the sharp stones on life's path. (Kahlil Gibran, artist, poet)

Following are organ marches that may be used as the Processional, the Recessional or Postlude. So pick one, two or three of these...

Bridal Chorus

posted Aug 28, 2015, 7:09 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 7:09 PM ]

Title: Bridal Chorus (from Lohengrin)
Composer: R. Wagner

Notes: Only for the bride's entrance. Treulich geführt in German, it's from the 1850 opera Lohengrin. Unofficially called Here Comes the Bride or Wedding March. Like Mendelssohn's Wedding March, it also became popular when it was used at the wedding of Victoria the Princess Royal to Prince Frederick William of Prussia in 1858.

Canon in D

posted Aug 28, 2015, 6:52 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 6:53 PM ]

Title: Canon in D
Composer: J. Pachelbel

Notes: Commonly used as a Processional, but also heard sometimes as a Prelude. Also known as Pachelbel's Canon, it's original title was Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo. It was heard at the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. It's simple chordal progression has been appropriated in numerous commercial pop hits, including Pet Shop Boys cover of Go West; Green Day's Basket Case and Kylie Minogue's I Should Be So Lucky.

Prince of Denmark's March

posted Aug 28, 2015, 6:35 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 6:57 PM ]

Title: Prince of Denmark's March
Composer: J. Clarke

Notes: Most frequently used as a Processional, but can also be a Recessional. Commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, it was composed ca. 1700 in honor of Prince George of Denmark. Like the composer's Trumpet Tune in D, for many years it was incorrectly attributed to Henry Purcell. It became very popular after it was played as the Processional for the wedding of Lady Diana Spencer and Prince Charles at St. Paul's Cathedral in 1981. A brief portion of it can be heard in the fade-out of The Beatles' It's All Too Much. And it was used on The Colbert Report as the theme for the recurring segments "Colbert Platinum" (on trumpet) and "Colbert Aluminum" (on kazoo).

Trumpet Tune in D

posted Aug 28, 2015, 5:57 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 5:58 PM ]

Title: Trumpet Tune in D
Composer: J. Clarke

Notes: Can be a Processional, Recessional or Postlude. It's frequently, though incorrectly, attributed to Henry Purcell, including here on this video. It's taken from the English "semi-opera" The Island Princess, which was a joint production of Clarke and Henry Purcell's younger brother, Daniel—probably leading to the confusion.

Wedding March

posted Aug 28, 2015, 5:44 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 7:11 PM ]

Title: Wedding March
Composer: F. Mendelssohn

Notes: Most commonly used as a Recessional. Composed in 1842, it's his best known piece from his Suite of Incidental Music (Op. 61) to Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream. Like Wagner's Bridal Chorus, it too became popular at weddings after it was selected by Victoria, The Princess Royal for her marriage to Prince Frederick William of Prussia on January 25, 1858. She was the daughter of Queen Victoria, who loved Mendelssohn's music and for whom he often played while on his visits to Britain. It's opening phrase was used as the introduction to the theme song of the 1960's hit TV show, The Newlywed Game.

Ode to Joy

posted Aug 28, 2015, 5:05 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 5:05 PM ]

Title: Ode to Joy (from The Ninth Symphony)
Composer: L. von Beethoven

Notes: Also known by the hymn title "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee". In 1972, this melody (without the words) was adopted as the Anthem of Europe by the Council of Europe and subsequently by the European Union in 1985. It's become particularly popular during the Easter season.

Hornpipe

posted Aug 28, 2015, 4:51 PM by Steven Vaughan   [ updated Aug 28, 2015, 7:16 PM ]

Title: Hornpipe (from Water Music Suite)
Composer: G. F. Handel

Notes: Most commonly used as a Postlude, but can be a Recessional as well. Originally composed in 1717 for King George I, to be played on the royal barge during his excursion up the River Thames.

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